Programs

       A year consists of three ten week quarters, September/October through June.
       Five courses (which on average will add up to 15 quarter units) will be considered a full time load.
       The Two Year Program will give the graduate a good basic education and an Associate of Theology degree, made up of 90 quarter units of class work.
       The Four Year Program will give the graduate a more extensive education and a Bachelor of Theology degree, made up of 180 quarter units of class work.
       The Seven Year Program will give the graduate a Master of Divinity degree, made up of 135 quarter units of class work (in addition to 180 units from undergraduate work) and a Master's thesis of at least one hundred pages. See Graduate Division section for more detail.

One Year Diploma of Theology Program

       For the benefit of those who wish more background in theology and Bible, but don't want to commit to a full degree program, Quartz Hill School of Theology has prepared a Diploma Program, which can be completed in one year. It consists of the following six classes:

1. Bible Summary
2. Apologetics
3. Logical Reasoning and Research
4. Theology
5. Bible Survey (any two quarters: there are six quarters in the complete survey)
6. World Religions.

       Each quarter consists of nine units (except for the first quarter, which consists of eight units), corresponding to nine (or eight) hours of in-class time per ten week quarter.
       Those finishing the full one year course will receive a Diploma of Theology; all units may be applied toward an Associate of Theology or higher degree. The student need not decide in advance which of the three degrees or one diploma program to attempt, as they build on top of each other. A person with an Associate of Theology degree could easily add two years and get a Bachelor of Theology degree and so on.
       Flexibility is the key to the nature of the program at Quartz Hill School of Theology. Courses are offered at various times, mostly at night and on weekends, so that a student can easily work and get an education at the same time. The student needn't take a full load, but can stretch the program out to whatever is most convenient, even taking only one class at a time if that is all that he or she can handle. The Two Year Program is so-called on the assumption that the student takes a full load; the same goes for the Four and Seven Year Programs. If the student takes less than a full load the programs will take correspondingly longer.