Remata

Welcome to the Remata home page!

Remata is a flashcard program. Remata was originally developed for Koine Greek -- the Greek of the Bible's New Testament. "Remata" means "words" in Koine. Remata's flashcards can be thought of as knowledge broken down into small units or words.

Remata was developed by Eric Miller. He has studied and taught Koine (New Testament) Greek for many years. He also is a professional software developer. As with any language, there is a lot to learn in Greek. Eric has long sought after helpful learning tools. In particular, he has looked for and tried to develop useful flashcard tools.

Many years ago Eric found a spreadsheet of Koine words. This spreadsheet was developed by Lionel Windsor. It is a good spreadsheet but Eric felt it needed improvement. He radically redesigned the code, added many functions and changed the Greek to a modern unicode font. You can see and download the result here. One big feature of flashcards is that they are portable. Eric was hoping that the Remata spreadsheet would work on his portable, Windows based PDA. Unfortunately it did not. The spreadsheet also was exclusive to people who owned Microsoft Excel. This lead him to develop a Web version of Remata which is here. As it turned out the web version was also not portable since PDA browsers could not handle the Javascript he used to make it work.

Eric, who is a T-Mobile customer and Google fan, stumbled across the new Android platform and now owns the T-Mobile G1. He developed a version of Remata for Android, which is described here. He finally has a flashcard program that is portable and can handle Koine Greek. As a side benefit, the Android version of Remata accepts text files as input. It is not limited to Koine Greek but can be used for any type of textual information.

Donations

Eric has worked hard to develop Remata. It is offered free of charge. However, Eric would appreciate some compensation for his effort. If you wish to donate to him push the "Donate" button. Note that the donations go to Eric Miller. They do not go to Quartz Hill School of Theology nor Quartz Hill Community Church. They are not tax deductable.